The German Infantry Battalion of World War II was the smallest tactical battle group. It was composed of 3 rifle companies, 1 machine gun company, 1 infantry engineer platoon, 1 intelligence unit. The German infantry battalion included one commander, 13 officers, 1 official and 846 non-commissioned officers. The battalion commander, an Oberstleutnant (Major), was responsible for the entire battalion in all ways and areas. He had the duty of carrying out orders and directives received from his superior officers, and gave the appropriate commands to his battalion. The logistic support of the battalion fighting units consisted of combat supply troop, supply troop I, supply troop II, and pack train.

The machine gun company of the German Infantry Battalion was not a company equipped only with machine guns, but it was a unit with mixed weapons, in which the heavy machine guns (sMG) and the 81mm and 50mm mortars of a company were gathered as flat and high-angle weapons. The heavy machine guns used by the machine gun companies were – as noted – the flat-fire weapons of the battalion and simultaneously represented the heaviest infantry firepower. They were used in all kinds of combat and formed the "backbone" of the fighting at medium and long ranges. The firepower of the machine gun company formed a strong support for the rifle companies. During the course of the war, heavy machine guns and mortars provided full support wherever they were applied, and were irreplaceable to the end of the war.

The infantry engineer platoon was assembled only when needed to carry out technical assignments of a simple kind. The rifle companies provided soldiers specially trained in infantry engineering service. The assignment of the battalion intelligence unit was to set up contact with the companies, the detailed heavy weapons and the next battalion on the right. Further connections within the battalion were handled by bicycle and motorcycle messengers (to the combat supply troop by bicycle messenger, to the general and combat supply troops by motorcycle messenger).

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