Tanks of Korean War

Nearly all the tanks and armored vehicles used in the Korean War had already seen combat action in World War II, such as the M4 Sherman, M24 Chaffee, M41 Walker Bulldog, M26 Pershing, Churchill (Mk IV), Cromwell (Mk VIII), and the Soviet-made T-34 tank. The exceptions were the M46 Patton, which was a derivative of the M26 Pershing, and the British Centurion Mk 3.

The Chaffee and the Walker Bulldog were light US tanks armed with 75 and 76mm guns respectively; the Sherman was a medium tank also armed with a 75mm gun, but with better armor protection on the front than the first two tanks. These three American tanks, which had not been a match for the German tanks in World War II, were used by the US Army in Korea in the roles of infantry support, providing artillery fire, and reconnaissance. With a weight of 28 tons, the Cromwell was a British medium tank, armed with a 75mm cannon; the Churchill was a heavy tank, which weighed 40 tons and had a 75mm gun; both tanks had been used in Korea by the British and Australian armies. The T-34 was a Soviet-made medium tank used by the Chinese and North Korean forces; it weighed 27 tons and was fitted out with 76mm gun.

The three tanks which stood out from the rest of the armored vehicles in the Korean War were the M26 Pershing, which was a 46-ton tank armed with a 90mm gun; the M46 Patton, which was a 44-ton tank developed from the former and which was also fitted with a 90mm cannon; and the British Centurion, which was armed with 105mm gun, weighed 51 tons, had 150mm-thick steel armor protection on the front, and was powered by a 655-hp Rolls-Royce Meteor engine. From these three heavy tanks, it was the British Centurion which outlived them all as it saw combat action not only in the Korean War, but also in the Vietnam War (used by Australian Army units), in the 1967 Six-Day War and the 1973 Yom Kippur War (used by the Israeli Defense Force).

British Centurion Mk 3, an excellent tank that was used in several armed conflicts.

 

M46 tank was a reliable tank, which was later replaced by the M47.

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