Signed on September 27, 1940, the Tripartite Pact was a political agreement that aligned ideologically and militarily Germany, Italy, and Japan. The pact was signed in Berlin by Adolf Hitler and the representatives of the other two nations: the Italian foreign minister Galeazzo Ciano and the Japanese ambassador Saburo Kurusu. In the Tripartite Pact the Axis Powers resolved that they would provide mutual assistance if any of the signatories were attacked by a country which was not already engaged in World War II. The pact also promoted the prosperity and welfare of the Axis nations peoples. The signatory nations leaders acknowledged each other’s spheres of influence: Germany in Europe; Italy in the Mediterranean and North Africa; and Japan in East Asia and the Pacific.

The Tripartite Pact was composed of six articles which stated their agreement and goals: 1) Japan recognized and respected the leadership of Germany and Italy in the establishment of a new world order in Europe; 2) Germany and Italy recognized and respect the leadership of Japan in the establishment of a new world order in Greater East Asia; 3) Japan, Germany, and Italy agreed to cooperate in their efforts on the aforesaid lines, further undertaking to assist one another with all political, economic and military means when one of the three contracting parties is attacked by a power at present not involved in the European war or in the Sino-Japanese conflict; 4) in order to effect this alliance, joint specialized committees composed of members appointed by each power would meet as early as possible; 5) Japan, Germany, and Italy affirmed that the aforesaid terms did not in any way affect the political status which existed at that moment as between each of the three contracting powers and Soviet Russia; 6) this alliance would become effective on the day of signature and would remain in force for the period of ten years.

Tripartite Pact (Video)

Related posts:

Night of Broken Glass (Kristallnacht)
First Steam Locomotive
German Unconditional Surrender